Author: Sarah Redlich

Graduate Certificate in College Instruction

The Graduate Certificate in College Instruction has an upcoming application deadline of 11/15.  The Graduate Certificate in College Instruction aims to provide students with opportunities to develop knowledge and skills useful in their current and future careers as teaching professionals in a variety of higher education settings. See more information on our website (gcci.uconn.edu).

Applications go through the graduate school. Required application materials:

  • CV/Resume
  • A personal statement addressing your interest in the Certificate in College Instruction and how your current or future goals will be served through completion of the Certificate.
  • One letter of recommendation that addresses why you are a good candidate for the Certificate in College Instruction. Your letter writer should send the letter electronically per the application instructions.
  • Transcripts (current UConn students only need to upload an unofficial transcript to the application portal).

There is a virtual information session for prospective students next Thursday, the 24th from 6:30-7pm. Students can email kristi.kaeppel@uconn.edu to sign up.

Winter 2019 Funding: Laura Bassi Scholarship

The Laura Bassi Scholarship, which awards a total of $8,000 thrice per annum, was established by Editing Press in 2018 with the aim of providing editorial assistance to postgraduates and junior academics whose research focuses on neglected topics of study, broadly construed. The scholarships are open to every discipline and the next round of funding will be awarded in December 2019:

Winter 2019

Application deadline: 25 November 2019

Results: 15 December 2019

All currently enrolled master’s and doctoral candidates are eligible to apply, as are academics in the first five years of their employment.

Applicants are required to submit a completed application form along with their CV through the application portal by the relevant deadline. Further details, previous winners, and the application portal can be found at:

https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fediting.press%2Fbassi&data=02%7C01%7Cpsychgrad%40uconn.edu%7C6583d59ed82048e5bb8008d75328a5a4%7C17f1a87e2a254eaab9df9d439034b080%7C0%7C0%7C637069306351679220&sdata=VBIr7dxINEPpjPlYf87%2BouHLRDL%2B1tVTln5xrj2LxyY%3D&reserved=0

Spring Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship Applications

Pending budgetary approval, The Graduate School awards a limited number of Spring Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship (DDF) awards to students in doctoral programs requiring a dissertation.   The fellowship is awarded in the amount of $ 2,000 to each eligible applicant.  Please note that fellowship funds are not guaranteed to any student who applies for the award.

To be eligible for the fellowship, an applicant must:

1. Be a doctoral student.

2. Be enrolled in the semester in which the fellowship is awarded.

3. Document satisfactory completion and approval of the General Exam prior to midnight on November 30, 2019.

4. Document satisfactory completion and submission of the Dissertation Proposal, including full and current IRB or IACUC approval if required, prior to midnight on November 30, 2019.

5. Never have previously received a Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship award.

Applications will be accepted from Friday, November 1, 2019 through Friday, November 30, 2019. Applications received prior to November 1, 2019 or after November 30, 2019 will not be considered. To apply please fill out the online application form between November 1 and November 30 by going to https://grad.uconn.edu then click on Financing. In the drop down click on Fellowships and Awards.  Notifications will be e-mailed to each applicant by the end of December 2019.

This fellowship can only be awarded to an individual once. Doctoral students based at UConn Health and UConn Law School are not eligible to apply.

For more information, contact: The Graduate School at gradschool@uconn.edu

Maric Graduate Fellowship Accepting Applications

Graduate Student Call for Applications: Dr. Radenka Maric Graduate Fellowship

The Graduate School is sponsoring a new set of fellowships this year. Dr. Radenka Maric Fellowships seek to develop a cohort of students who are looking for connections beyond what they can find in their own department. Ten fellowships will be awarded across the university, with one fellow selected from among the Departments and Programs of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. In addition to a $3,000 stipend, fellowship recipients will be invited to meet together for social, roundtable, and professional development meetings.

To be eligible for a Maric Fellowship, you must

  1. Be a masters or doctoral student enrolled in The Graduate School
  2. Demonstrate financial need or be meritorious

In selecting a student for a Maric Fellowship, priority will be given to students who:

  1. Have overcome obstacles such as socioeconomic or educational disadvantage; or,
  2. Are members of groups that are underrepresented at the University of Connecticut; or,
  3. Have experience living or working in diverse environments.

This is a non-endowed fellowship. It may be renewed annually pending availability of funds and provided that the Fellow continues to meet the criteria above and that the Fellow has participated in activities that The Graduate School organizes for Fellows.

Graduate Students interested in applying for the fellowship should provide the following information:

  1. A brief summary of financial need and/or accomplishments as a UConn graduate student
  2. A short essay addressing the extent to which you satisfy one or more of the three priority criteria listed above. In the essay, also address how you would benefit from being a part of a supportive cohort.
  3. A letter of support from your graduate advisor or a professor who can speak to your graduate performance at UConn.

 

Please submit your application to CLAS@uconn.edu no later than 4pm, October 21.

HDFS online graduate course open to psychology students

Dear Students,

I’m writing to let you know of a HDFS graduate course that will be offered in the spring semester. The course is called “Bullying and Victimization in Childhood and Adolescence” (HDFS 5095.001). This course is open to graduate students in Psychological Sciences. As this course is only offered once every several years, I wanted to share this with you in case this is a topic that you’re interested in learning more about.

Here’s a brief description of the course:

This course provides graduate students with a comprehensive and critical understanding of bullying in childhood and adolescence. As bullying is a multi-faceted problem, the course will address the role that peers, families, schools, media, culture, and governmental policies play in both perpetuating youth bullying and helping to reduce bullying of youth. We will examine the impact of bullying on psychological functioning, social adjustment, and physical health of youth, and factors that increase risk versus resilience in youth who are bullied. Students will learn about research on school-based prevention and intervention programs, assessment of bullying in youth, and laws and policies that can help to reduce youth bullying. This course is relevant for diverse disciplines relevant to youth health and wellbeing, including Human Development & Family Sciences, Psychological Sciences, Social Work, Education, Nursing, Allied Health, and others.

This is an online course, so there are no in-person classes, which makes it easy for scheduling your other courses. The course format includes online video seminars, readings, and online weekly discussion forums where we discuss important questions related to each week’s topic.

*In the past, several senior honors students (undergraduates) in Psychological Sciences have taken this course, with permission from their department/advisor. Interested honors students can contact me for further information.

If you would like to learn more about the course, please feel free to be in touch with me (Rebecca.puhl@uconn.edu). I would be happy to send you the full syllabus, and/or meet with you if you have additional questions.

Best,

Dr. Puhl

 

Rebecca Puhl, PhD
Professor, Department of Human Development & Family Sciences

Deputy Director, Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity
University of Connecticut
www.uconnruddcenter.org

Spring 2020 Grad Course Offering: Advanced Programming with Data in R

Advanced Programming with Data in R

Instructor: Adam Sheya

Date/Time is TBD.

Description

The purpose of this course is to help graduate students acquire programming skills that make organizing, transforming, visualizing, and presenting data more efficient and reproducible as well as support data analysis workflows and model building. This is a lab based course and lectures are minimal. Class time will be spent practicing the art of programming with data under the instructor’s guidance. Students are encouraged to interject their own data and projects into the course. We will be using R and RStudio but the programming concepts and practices translate to other languages and environments like Python.  Students are expected to have a basic familiarity with R and have completed at least the introductory statistics courses. Ideally students will already have experience in analyzing their own data. Students will be evaluated on their performance in the weekly lab activities. The labs are designed to be completed within the class time. Students are encouraged to integrate what they learn in the class into their data analysis activities outside of class. Topics include Basic R Commands and Concepts , Data Objects, Subsetting, Control Flow, Functions, Environments, Conditions, Scripts, Functional Programming in R, Debugging, Performance, Interfacing with other languages, Visualization, and formatting articles and presentations. Topics and depth of coverage will be adjusted to student need and interest.

Fall 2019 Graduate Seminar in Academic Writing: 10/08 to 11/05

Fall 2019 Graduate Seminar in Academic Writing: 10/08 to 11/05 (5 weeks) – Tuesdays, 4pm to 6pm.

Each academic year, the UConn Writing Center offers 3 no-cost, five-week seminars in academic writing for UConn graduate students. These seminars do not carry UConn academic credit, nor are they graded. We simply aim to assist motivated graduate students in developing strategies for writing that will serve them well in their academic and professional careers.The goal is to help graduate writers develop a toolbox of composing, revising, and peer-review skills.

Participants must bring to the seminar a draft of a writing project (at least 5 double-spaced pages). Most seminar sessions involve working on this draft, and most of our time is dedicated to developing skills for revising and on cultivating productive writing habits.

Participants should expect to commit 5 hours per week: 2 in class and 3 outside of class to complete readings and assignments.

If you have questions about the seminar or are interested in seeing a syllabus, please contact the Coordinator for Graduate Writing Support at gradwriting@uconn.edu. The seminars are made possible through funding from the Graduate School and the University Writing Center.

MORE INFO & APPLICATION

 

Invitation to the 2nd UConn Brain Research Symposium-September 20

We are pleased to invite you to the Second UConn Brain Research Symposium, which will be held September 20th at the Mark Twain House and Museum in Hartford.  This year’s focus will be on collaborative research across departments, campuses and institutions.  The format for the symposium will include talks related to basic neuroscience in the morning, a networking lunch including “lunch and learns” with key research and department/center/institute leaders, and clinical neuroscience and psychological science talks in the afternoon.  Presentations will be from colleagues at UConn Storrs, UConn Health, Connecticut Childrens Medical Center, the Jackson Laboratory and Hartford Hospital.

We hope that you can join us for the whole day, but if you can only join for half the day, please plan on coming for lunch, as it will give you a great opportunity to interact with individuals who you otherwise might not connect with in person.

So that we can get a head count for the facility, for coffee breaks and for lunch, we would really appreciate it if you could complete the following doodle poll, which will allow you to indicate whether you will attend the morning session, lunch and the afternoon session.  Key for us is getting a count of folks who will be at lunch.

SIGN-UP to attend UConn’s 2nd Brain Research Symposium

Attendance will be limited to the first 135 people who sign up for the Brain Symposium.

Thanks again, and we look forward to your participation.  Meeting materials will be sent out in the coming weeks.

 

David C. Steffens, M.D., M.H.S.

Samuel “Sy” Birnbaum/Ida, Louis and Richard Blum Chair in Psychiatry

Professor and Chair of Psychiatry

University of Connecticut School of Medicine

 

Professor Gerry T.M. Altmann

Department of Psychological Sciences

Director, CT Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences

University of Connecticut

InCHIP Graduate Student/Post-Doc Poster Competition and Showcase

InCHIP is holding a poster competition/showcase for graduate students and post-docs during its Annual Meeting on September 26th. The top 3 posters, as judged by InCHIP Leadership, will be announced at the InCHIP Annual Meeting. Winners will receive small monetary awards.

More information regarding the competition, its rules and expectations, as well as the submission portal can be found here.

Please note: Applicants must submit a PDF of their poster via the form below, no later than 11:59 pm on Monday, September 16, 2019. Prior to the Annual Meeting, they will be emailed written instructions on when and where to bring their printed posters.

If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to Grace K. Morris (grace.morris@uconn.edu)

Social Division Talk: Dr. Mina Cikara

You are invited to a social division talk by Dr. Mina Cikara from Harvard University on Wed. Sept 25 and 2 pm in Room 162, BOUS. Her talk title and abstract follow.

Leveraging choice architecture to alter social preferences

Stereotypes and associated emotions drive discriminatory behavior across numerous consequential contexts. These biases against marginalized social groups have important implications for real-world social decisions, including hiring, voting, health, and housing decisions. Psychologists have traditionally studied how people evaluate different ethnic and cultural groups (and their members) in isolation, but in the real world people commonly make judgments and decisions over sets of people. For example, hiring decisions involve the assessment of multiple candidates at once. Across a series of experiments, we harness insights from computational models of decision-making to examine whether choice set construction—or choice architecture—can be used to influence decision-makers’ preferences in consequential social decisions. I will review several findings including a combination of field data and lab experiments to examine the effect of alternatives, or decoys, on social evaluations and decisions in hiring and election contexts.