Spring 2019

April 8, 9, Lang&Cogntion and ECOM talks: : Peter Langland-Hassan

 

 Guest Prof. Peter Langland-Hassan of the University of Cincinnati. Langland-Hassan has done very interesting work in both philosophy and psychology, and is engaged in exciting interdisciplinary research projects with philosophical roots. He will be giving two talks (see below). HE’d be happy to meet to discuss any of his work. There are still a couple of slots available to meet with him on Tuesday (at UCHI). If you’d like to meet with him, or join dinner on Mon or Tues please contact dorit.bar-on@uconn.edu to arrange it and cc aliyar.ozercan@uconn.edu

  1. A Role for Inner Speech in Abstract Thought:  Results from People with Aphasia, Monday April 8, 3:30-5, Arjona 307 (The Language and Cognition Brown Bag)

Peter Langland-Hassan, Aimee Dietz, Michael J. Richardson, Frank R. Faries, and Maxwell Gatyas

What cognitive roles are played by inner speech (or “the little voice in the head”)?  Were we to lose inner speech altogether, are there non-linguistic cognitive tasks that would become more difficult, or even impossible?  I begin with some theoretical background on the relations among inner speech, thought, and language more generally.  Next, our team’s efforts at developing objective measures for assessing inner speech abilities in a population with outer speech deficits are described.  Some of this evidence suggests that inner speech can be more severely affected by stroke than outer speech.  Results from a proprietary semantic memory task, developed for the experiment, are then described.  Each trial of this task was initially normed for a level of “abstractness.”  As would be expected, people with aphasia, on average, scored lower than matched controls across all semantic memory trials.  Interestingly, however, the aphasic population showed proportionately more pronounced difficulties as the trials grew more abstract in nature.  This suggests an especially strong role for language (and inner speech) in specific kinds of categorization tasks that are not overtly language-involving.

  1. Explaining Imagination:  A Reductive Account, Tuesday April 9, 4:30-6, UCHI Seminar Room (Babbidge Lib 4th floor)

It is a truth universally acknowledged that imagination is a primitive mental state type, irreducible to other mental state types.   This is, at least, “one of four basic claims about imagination that enjoy near universal agreement” (Kind, 2016)[1].  I will challenge this orthodox view, arguing that imagination can in fact be reduced to, and explained in terms of, one’s being other kinds of familiar folk psychological mental states.  The full case for this account is developed in a book I am now completing.  Today I simply aim to clear space for the approach by undermining the most commonly voiced—and seemingly most decisive—reasons for thinking that imagination is irreducible to other mental state types. 

CCC Flyer

(For another reminderRegistration for ECOM’s Spring Workshop Communication, Context, Conversation will close April 15. (See attached flyer.) You can register here.

Show a video of your research on the Psych Sciences Dept website

Dear Graduate Students,

The Department of Psychological Sciences is pleased to offer you the opportunity to submit a short video describing and promoting your research. The video will be displayed on the monitors located around the Bousfield building as well as on the Graduate Psychological Sciences webpage. Note last year we had over 20,000 hits to our site!

Check out Martin Flament Fultot grad student in Ecological Psychology’s video: https://grad.psych.uconn.edu/2019/03/27/center-for-the-ecological-study-of-perception-and-action/

Interested in showcasing your research? See the “Departmental Promotional Video Information and Consent Form” found on our website: Official Promo Video Info & Consent Form

Questions? Martin is available to assist you. Feel free to email (martin.flament_fultot@uconn.edu) with any questions.

Best,

Graduate Program Office

Graduate Seminar in Academic Writing- April 2019

Greetings from the Writing Center,

The second iteration of our 5-week Graduate Seminar in Academic Writing for Spring 2019 is coming up and you can apply for it now if you are interested. The in-person sessions run on Tuesdays, 2pm-4pm, between April 2nd and April 30th. Here is the announcement with the details and the application link:

http://dailydigest.uconn.edu/publicEmailSingleStoryView.php?id=126248&cid=24&iid=3802

New positions at ILCB on Language, Communication and the Brain

New positions at ILCB on Language, Communication and the Brain

  • Two 2-year postdoc
  • Two PhD grants

________________________________________________________________________________________

Two 2-year postdoc positions at Aix-Marseille/Avignon on Language, Communication and the Brain

The Center of Excellence on Brain and Language (BLRI, https://www.ilcb.fr/) and the Institute of Language, Communication and the Brain (ILCB, https://www.ilcb.fr/) offer:

Two 2-year postdoc positions on any topic that falls within the area of language, communication, brain and modelling. The institute provides privileged and free access to MEG and fMRI facilities.

The scientific project, ideally interdisciplinary, should be supervised by at least one member of the BLRI/ILCB (see https://www.ilcb.fr/members/ilcb-fellows/) and should, if possible, involve two different laboratories of the institute.

A complete application should contain:

  1. A full description of the research project (~ 5 pages):
  2. Title
  3. Name of the collaborator/supervisor/sponsor within the BLRI-ILCB
  4. Short Summary
  5. Scientific context/state of the art/
  6. Objectives and hypotheses
  7. Methodology
  8. Expected results
  9. Brief statement about the relevance of the project for the BLRI/ILCB
  10. Proposed Timeline
  11. CV with complete list of publications
  12. Letter of motivation
  13. One letter of recommendation or contact information of a potential referee

The BLRI-ILCB is located in Aix-en-Provence, Avignon and Marseille and regroups several research centers in linguistics, psychology, cognitive neuroscience, medicine, computer science, and mathematics.

  • Deadline for submission: June 11, 2019
  • Pre-selection of candidates for audition: June 20, 2019
  • Auditions: June 28  (international candidates might be interviewed via skype)

Duration: 2 years (1 year, extendable for another year)

Monthly salary: ~1974.27 € net (depending on experience)

Applications should be sent to: nadera.bureau@blri.fr

For supplementary information: Johannes.Ziegler@univ-amu.fr

 

Two PhD grants at Aix-Marseille/Avignon on Language, Communication and the Brain

The Center of Excellence on Brain and Language (BLRI, https://www.ilcb.fr/) and the Institute of Language, Communication and the Brain (ILCB, https://www.ilcb.fr/ ) award

Two PhD grants (3 years) on any topic that falls within the area of language, communication, brain and modelling. The institute provides privileged and free access to fMRI and MEG facilities.

The BLRI-ILCB is located in Aix-en-Provence, Avignon and Marseille and regroups several research centers in linguistics, psychology, cognitive neuroscience, medicine, computer science, and mathematics.

Interested candidates need to find one or more PhD supervisors amongst the members of the BRLI-ILCB (https://www.ilcb.fr/members/ilcb-fellows/) Together with the supervisor(s), they would then need to write a 3-year PhD project. A priority is given to interdisciplinary co-directions and to projects that involve two different laboratories of the institute.

The application should contain:

  1. A full description of the PhD project (~ 5 pages):
  2. Title
  3. Name of the PhD supervisor(s)
  4. Short Summary
  5. Scientific context/state of the art/
  6. Objectives and hypotheses
  7. Methodology
  8. Expected results
  9. Brief statement about the relevance of the project for the BLRI/ILCB
  10. Proposed Timeline
  11. CV and master degree grades (if available)
  12. Letter of motivation
  13. One letter of recommendation or contact information of a potential referee
  • Deadline for submission: June 11, 2019
  • Pre-selection of candidates for audition: June 20, 2019
  • Auditions: June 28  (international candidates might be interviewed via skype)

Start: September 1, 2019

Monthly salary: 1364.97€ net for a period of 3 years

Applications should be sent to: nadera.bureau@blri.fr

For supplementary information contact: Johannes.Ziegler@univ-amu.fr

2019 Fredric M. Jablin Doctoral Dissertation Award

Dear Professor:

I want to call your attention to the Fredric M. Jablin Doctoral Dissertation Award, which I hope will interest your doctoral students. A description of the award and the application process can be found at http://jepson.richmond.edu/about/jablin-dissertation-award/index.html.

Established in 1992, the Jepson School of Leadership Studies takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of leadership. Jepson faculty members make significant contributions to their home disciplines as well as to the field of leadership studies. They come from leading doctoral programs in traditional academic disciplines such as religious studies, philosophy, and social psychology.

This interdisciplinary approach to leadership is reflected in our recent selection of recipients for the Jablin Dissertation Award. Past winners earned their doctorates in such areas as history at Stanford, political science at Michigan State, and religion at Princeton University.

I hope that you will consider nominating one of your doctoral students for the award. I would be most willing to discuss the award with you or any potential recipients you may know. The deadline for applications is May 15, 2019.

Sincerely,

Dean, Jepson School of Leadership Studies

Spring Break Dissertation Boot Camp – Writing Center

Spring Break Writing Boot Camp

Monday, March 18th, to Thursday, March 21st, 9am – 4pm

Storrs Campus, Pharmacy Library

NEW SIGN-UP OPTIONS! You can now sign up for 2-, 3-, or 4-day boot camps!

Maintaining momentum on your writing can be tough, but making a commitment to structured writing time can help. Writing in the presence of others can also bring a sense of solidarity and productivity that can get you through even the toughest projects.

Participants will arrive with their writing projects on and their laptops, along with any notes or books. There will not be any tutoring or any lectures. The point is simply to make a commitment to sustained writing time and to generating pages.

Space is limited and preference will be given to 4-day participants. To reserve your spot and to create an incentive for you to write, you must register through Eventbrite and submit a promissory note for $50 (no money will be charged unless you miss the event without a reason; this is done to ensure accountability). An electronic version of the promissory note is now available on the Writing Center website and should be signed and email to gradwriting@uconn.edu. Hard copies are also available at the Writing Center. 

EVENTBRITE REGISTRATION

 

For more information, contact: Gali – Writing Center at gradwriting@uconn.edu

Submit Papers for The 7th Annual Black Doctoral Network Conference

The Black Doctoral Network Conference Committee is inviting abstract submissions for the 2019 conference themed “Fostering Change through Scholarship”. This year’s conference addresses the role of change, i. e., social justice and/or activism through scholarship. “Fostering Change through Scholarship” encourages attendees to consider how we can create change across social domains (individual, family, peers, school and neighborhood/community levels) in society via scholarship and to assess the variations of academic knowledge. The theme of the annual meeting asks: How does our work in public and private spaces impact scholarship and the lives of vulnerable populations? How are scholars of color flourishing in marginal spaces and fostering the flourishing of others through activism scholarship? We invite broad engagement between activists, scholar-practitioners and academics that address the conference theme.  Papers that will reflect on this theme are especially encouraged, but we accept submissions on any topic. The Conference will be an interdisciplinary event that brings together academics and professionals from the social sciences, STEM, and humanities to address how we can positively impact and inform each other’s work and engage with our communities. Submission of abstracts from graduate and doctoral students, recent Ph.D. graduates and academic professionals across disciplines are welcome.

Submission Deadline: Sunday, March 17, 2019 at 11:59PM EST.

To submit an abstract visit: blackphdnetwork.submittable.com/submit

SUBMISSION INFORMATION:

We accept abstracts from (1) individuals who wish to present on a panel and from (2) groups who want to create their own panel. Abstracts should be no more than 300 words typed, double spaced, using a 12pt font. Submissions should be anonymous – please do not include your name or the name of your institution on the document. Include the title of your abstract and note whether it is an individual or a group submission. All group submissions require at least three presenters.

Submitting author will receive a confirmation message upon submitting the abstract. Acceptance announcements will be sent via email in late April to the submitting author. Accepted presenters and co-presenters must register for the conference and confirm their acceptance by June 9, 2019. Failure to register and confirm acceptance by June 1st will result in rescinding acceptance.

PRESENTATION DETAILS:

Your presentation should describe the purpose, methods and conclusions of your research. You may not submit or take part in more than one panel presentation; presenters may give one and only one paper at the conference. Individual presenters will be assigned to a panel and will have 15 minutes to deliver their presentations. Group presentations will be given 45-60 minutes to deliver their presentations.

CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS

In addition to interdisciplinary panel presentations, this conference will have interactive roundtables. Professors and corporate professionals from various fields will converse and give insight on the need for interconnectedness throughout the academy and community. Workshops on handling job talks, grant writing and proposals, balancing relationships, and stress and time management will also be addressed.

For questions regarding the Call for Papers please contact:

Deandra Taylor  at DTaylor@blackphdnetwork.com