Spring 2020

Doctoral Student Scholarship

The New Hampshire Psychological Association Educational Foundation is pleased to invite applications for our Student Achievement Award recognizing graduate students who have made significant contributions to the field of psychology, through work on research, teaching, mentorship, clinical work, civic engagement and/or other areas of community engagement. Award is $1,000.00.

More information available on the website https://www.nheducationalfoundation.org/  and on the attached PDF.

Graduate Seminar in Academic Writing (5 Weeks, starts February 10)

SPRING SEMINAR DATES:

Seminar #1 (Mondays, 6pm-8pm): February 10 – March 9

Seminar #2 (Thursdays, 6pm-8pm): April 2 – April 30

MORE INFO and APPLICATIONS: https://writingcenter.uconn.edu/graduate-seminar/ 

Each academic year, the UConn Writing Center offers 3 no-cost, five-week seminars in academic writing for UConn graduate students. These seminars do not carry UConn academic credit, nor are they graded. We simply aim to assist motivated graduate students in developing strategies for writing that will serve them well in their academic and professional careers.The goal is to help graduate writers develop a toolbox of composing, revising, and peer-review skills. 

The seminar aligns with our tutoring philosophy at the Writing Center: we begin by focusing on developing and clarifying main ideas, then work towards sentence-level writing concerns. Expect an interactive, collaborative space where writers to apply practical strategies at each phase of the revision process. Participants work mostly with peers but also get one-on-one feedback from the seminar leader. This is a writing workshop, not a traditional lecture or skills-and-drills grammar course. 

Participants must bring to the seminar a draft of a writing project (at least 5 double-spaced pages). Most seminar sessions involve working on this draft, and most of our time is dedicated to developing skills for revising and on cultivating productive writing habits.

Participants should expect to commit 5 hours per week: 2 in class and 3 outside of class to complete readings and assignments.

If you have questions about the seminar or are interested in seeing a syllabus, please contact the Coordinator for Graduate Writing Support at gradwriting@uconn.edu. The seminars are made possible through funding from the Graduate School and the University Writing Center.

Spring 2020 Grad Course Offering: The literate brain and mind

The literate brain and mind

Spring Semester 2020

Instructor:  Ken Pugh

Tuesday 10am-1pm

Location: TBD

Email: Kenneth.pugh@UConn.edu

Description: The development of reading and writing skills are essential for achieving success in the modern world, yet significant numbers of people from all languages and cultures fail to obtain adequate literacy outcomes.  This seminar examines the neurobiological and cognitive foundations of reading and writing. The course is aimed at providing students an introduction to research on gene-brain-behavior analyses of typical and atypically developing readers. Topics covered include recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between speech perception/production and individual differences in literacy learning, systems level research on the distributed brain circuits that develop to support word reading, text comprehension, second language learning, and the neurobiology of acquired and developmental reading and writing disorders. We will draw heavily on ongoing developmental research from our team at Haskins focused on early neurocognitive studies of reading difficulties in contrastive languages (including English, Mandarin, Spanish, Finnish, and Dutch). Over the course of the semester students will be able to acquire basic familiarity with cognitive methods and new tools for human brain mapping, and we will critically examine both the promise and the limitations of the current approaches to understanding language and literacy.

Required readings:

The required readings consist of articles and chapters that will be made available on line.  Students will be able to download the readings from a website made for the course by Week number (or in special cases may be responsible for photocopying an article or chapter). Each week we will have critical discussions of at least two primary articles.  In addition, supplementary articles will be assigned as background for class discussions.

Evaluation of Student Performance

Each student will be responsible for leading class discussions of at least four of the primary articles over the course of the semester.  The student leading a given discussion will be asked to write (and distribute one day before the class) a brief evaluation of the article highlighting major findings, and key strengths and weaknesses (this will also help prepare for leading the discussion).  A final research proposal is required. This document, be 5-10 pages in length and written using standard grant writing format, will present the design of novel experiments related to one of the major topics covered in the course. Each student will present an oral overview of their written proposal (10 minutes each) at the end of the semester.  Evaluation will be based on: 1) the research proposal and presentation (60%) and 2) class assignments and participation (40%).

Call for Travel Award Applications Open

TRAVEL AWARD STIPENDS – Call for Applications, 22nd Annual Genes, Brain and BehaviorMeeting of IBANGS 12-17th May 2020, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, USA

With the generous support of a grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism of the National Institutes of Health USA we are pleased to offer stipends in partial support of travel to attend the 22nd Genes, Brain and Behavior Meeting.

Travel Stipend Details:
A limited number of stipends are available for graduate students, post-doctoral scholars, and junior
faculty members. Individuals are eligible if they have held their current rank for 5 years or less.
Individuals who progress from one rank to another are eligible for 5 years at each successive rank: 5 years as a graduate student, 5 years as a postdoc, and 5 years as first-appointment junior faculty.

Selection will be based on the abstract submitted with meeting registration; financial need will also be a consideration. It is required that travel awardees present either an oral presentation or a poster at the meeting. It is not necessary for the presentation to involve studies related to alcohol, but preference will be given to those engaged in alcohol research.

From the Travel Awardees, four will be selected based on their proposed presentation at the meeting as the Outstanding Young Investigator Awardees. Two students, one postdoctoral scholar, and one junior faculty member will be invited to present their work in a special oral presentation session at the meeting.

Application Details: If you are not a member of IBANGS, consider becoming a member and taking
advantage of reduced registration fees for the 2020 meeting. For a description of additional membership benefits and to become a member please visit https://ibangs.memberclicks.net/why-join-ibangs

Register at https://ibangs.memberclicks.net/why-join-ibangs for the meeting and pay the appropriate registration fee. The deadline for discounted early registration fees is 22 March 2020. Submit your abstract through the online abstract submission page at Submit Abstract.

Submit the following items, by 15 February 2020, to Mark Rutledge-Gorman, preferably by email
(rutledgm@ohsu.edu) in Word, or by FAX 503-721-1029 (voice 503-220-8262, extension 56653) or
courier to VA Portland Health Care System R&D 12, 3710 SW US Veterans Hospital Road, Portland Oregon USA 97239-2964:

1) Abstract of 250 or fewer words; indicate your preference for a) oral or poster presentation, or b)
poster only

2) Letter that includes your contact information and describes your eligibility (e.g., in what year of what Ph.D. or M.D. program, or postdoctoral status, general thesis topic, adviser /supervisor’s name, year of holding faculty rank, etc.), how meeting attendance will further your career goals, why the work to be presented is deserving of recognition, a statement of financial need if relevant

3) Curriculum vitae

4) Letter from your advisor or Chair confirming eligibility and/or need

5) Estimate of the amount of stipend needed justified by a list of expenses (including amounts) such as transportation, lodging, etc.

You will receive confirmation of your application within three business days – if you do not receive confirmation, then contact Mark Rutledge-Gorman immediately.

The National Institutes of Health USA is committed to increasing the participation in science of underrepresented minorities and women, who are encouraged to apply.

Additional meeting program, venue, and lodging information is available at
https://ibangs.memberclicks.net/2020-genes-brain-and-behavior-meeting.

For More Information Contact: rutledgm@ohsu.edu Mark Rutledge-Gorman, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA The International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society (IBANGS) meets annually to discuss the multidisciplinary fields of neuro behavioural genetics.

Join us for the 22nd Annual Genes, Brain and Behavior Meeting
Marine Biological Laboratory
Woods Hole, MA, USA. May 12th-17th, 2020

HDFS online graduate course open to psychology students

Dear Students,

I’m writing to let you know of a HDFS graduate course that will be offered in the spring semester. The course is called “Bullying and Victimization in Childhood and Adolescence” (HDFS 5095.001). This course is open to graduate students in Psychological Sciences. As this course is only offered once every several years, I wanted to share this with you in case this is a topic that you’re interested in learning more about.

Here’s a brief description of the course:

This course provides graduate students with a comprehensive and critical understanding of bullying in childhood and adolescence. As bullying is a multi-faceted problem, the course will address the role that peers, families, schools, media, culture, and governmental policies play in both perpetuating youth bullying and helping to reduce bullying of youth. We will examine the impact of bullying on psychological functioning, social adjustment, and physical health of youth, and factors that increase risk versus resilience in youth who are bullied. Students will learn about research on school-based prevention and intervention programs, assessment of bullying in youth, and laws and policies that can help to reduce youth bullying. This course is relevant for diverse disciplines relevant to youth health and wellbeing, including Human Development & Family Sciences, Psychological Sciences, Social Work, Education, Nursing, Allied Health, and others.

This is an online course, so there are no in-person classes, which makes it easy for scheduling your other courses. The course format includes online video seminars, readings, and online weekly discussion forums where we discuss important questions related to each week’s topic.

*In the past, several senior honors students (undergraduates) in Psychological Sciences have taken this course, with permission from their department/advisor. Interested honors students can contact me for further information.

If you would like to learn more about the course, please feel free to be in touch with me (Rebecca.puhl@uconn.edu). I would be happy to send you the full syllabus, and/or meet with you if you have additional questions.

Best,

Dr. Puhl

 

Rebecca Puhl, PhD
Professor, Department of Human Development & Family Sciences

Deputy Director, Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity
University of Connecticut
www.uconnruddcenter.org

Spring 2020 Grad Course Offering: Advanced Programming with Data in R

Advanced Programming with Data in R

Instructor: Adam Sheya

Date/Time is TBD.

Description

The purpose of this course is to help graduate students acquire programming skills that make organizing, transforming, visualizing, and presenting data more efficient and reproducible as well as support data analysis workflows and model building. This is a lab based course and lectures are minimal. Class time will be spent practicing the art of programming with data under the instructor’s guidance. Students are encouraged to interject their own data and projects into the course. We will be using R and RStudio but the programming concepts and practices translate to other languages and environments like Python.  Students are expected to have a basic familiarity with R and have completed at least the introductory statistics courses. Ideally students will already have experience in analyzing their own data. Students will be evaluated on their performance in the weekly lab activities. The labs are designed to be completed within the class time. Students are encouraged to integrate what they learn in the class into their data analysis activities outside of class. Topics include Basic R Commands and Concepts , Data Objects, Subsetting, Control Flow, Functions, Environments, Conditions, Scripts, Functional Programming in R, Debugging, Performance, Interfacing with other languages, Visualization, and formatting articles and presentations. Topics and depth of coverage will be adjusted to student need and interest.

Clinical Psychology Research Talk Series

Clinical Research Seminar 2019-20
Wednesdays, 12:30-1:25, Bousfield 160

9/18 

Kristin Arapuano, Yale University
Contextualizing brain signatures of vulnerability to health-risk behaviors in the real world

10/9 

Diane Quinn, Social Division
Current research

10/16 

Brandi Simonsen, Neag School of Education
Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS): Building State, District, and School Systems to Support Students

10/23 

Nathaniel M. Rickles, School of Pharmacy
Integrating New & Old Approaches to Changing Patient and Provider Medication Use Behaviors: Applications to Mental Healthcare and Beyond

10/30 

Christine Yantz, Clinical Division
Third party observer effects in neuropsychological assessment

11/6 

Valori Ann Banfi, Science Librarian
Systematic Reviews and Scoping Reviews

12/4 

Devin Kearn, Neag School of Education
Research on brain processes in dyslexia

4/8/20 

Valori Ann Banfi, Science Librarian
Finding the Big Bucks: Funding Databases

Spring 2020 Psychological Sciences Colloquium Schedule (Updated)

Psychology Colloquium Schedule: Spring 2020

All talks will take place in BOUS A106 at 3:30pm on Wednesdays unless otherwise noted.

 

January 22, 2020

Scheduled Colloquium by Job Candidate

 

January 29, 2020

Scheduled Colloquium by Job Candidate

 

February 5, 2020

Scheduled Colloquium by Job Candidate

 

February 12, 2020

Scheduled Colloquium by Job Candidate

 

February 19, 2020

Scheduled Colloquium by Job Candidate

 

February 26, 2020

Dr. Dan Swingley, Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania

Title: TBA

 

March 4, 2020

Dr. Vic Ferreira, Department of Psychology, UC San Diego.

Title: TBA

 

March 11, 2020

Dr. Robin Vallacher, Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University.

Title: TBA

 

March 25, 2020

Dr. Robert Astur, Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut

Tenure Talk

Title: TBA

 

April 1, 2020

Dr. Inge-Marie Eigsti, Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut

Title: TBA

 

April 15, 2020

Dr. Ian Stevenson, Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut

Tenure Talk

Title: TBA

 

Fall ’19 / Spring ’20 BIRC Speaker Series announced

Fall 2019

First Tuesday of each month @ 1:30-3:00p in Arjona 307 unless noted*

**ALL TALKS CAN BE JOINED REMOTELY**

Vistors from UCHC are encouraged to use the UCHC-Storrs shuttle service. Please contact us if you are interested in meeting with a speaker.

Date Speaker Title
*Date Change*

09/10

Tor Wager, PhD

Dartmouth College (beginning July 2019)

TBA (MRI statistical analyses methods, pain processing)
*Date Change*

10/15

Uri Hasson, PhD

Princeton University

Face to Face, Brain to Brain: Exploring the Mechanisms of Dyadic Social
Interactions
11/05 Stephanie Jones, PhD

Brown University

TBA (integrating human brain imaging and computational neuroscience methods to study brain dynamics using MEG/EEG and tDCS/DBS/TMS)
12/03 Kimberly Noble, MD, PhD

Columbia University

TBA (socioeconomic disparities in children’s cognitive and brain development)

Spring 2020

First Tuesday of each month @ 3:30-5pm (location TBA)

Date Speaker Title
02/04 Katarzyna Chawarska, PhD

Yale University

TBA (social and affective dimensions of autism in young children)
03/03 David Badre, PhD

Brown University

TBA (cognitive neuroscience of memory and cognitive control)
04/07 Alex Martin PhD

NIH/NIMH

TBA (neural mechanisms of object recognition)
05/05 Michael Crowley, PhD

Yale University

TBA (brain basis of childhood anxiety disorders including avoidance, threat detection, and worry)